Compost for XL Vineyard
Biodiversity in XL Vineyard

SUSTAINABLE FARMING

It's not only ethical, it's simply smart farming

Reducing plant stress and nutrient imbalance, efficiently utilizing water and conserving the soil fertility ultimately optimizes grape quality and helps to conserve our earth. As voluntary members of Vinea and certified Salmon Safe, we use a variety of sustainable strategies:



Compost

XL Vineyard creates custom blended compost specifically for our vineyard based on the results of soil and water testing. The 'earth tea' created uses the thermal windrow process (a row of cut hay) to produce heat that kills weed seeds and plant disease-causing organisms. The heat is generated by decomposition of bacteria and fungi in the compost and is controlled by moisture and by turning the windrows that aerate them. This natural fertilizer and weed killer helps to grow healthy vines capable of withstanding disease and pest pressures.



Biodiversity

Planting botanically unrelated crops within the vineyard reduces and contains disease and creates an environment where vines are less susceptible to pests and disease. Our lavender, for example, is an effective companion plant as it attracts ladybugs that eat other insects that eat the leaves of the vines. The birdhouses on poles for hawks are important to keep away other birds that eat the fruit before its harvested. Barn owls are also useful to provide a natural predator to gophers and mice who tend to damage roots.



Active Water Management

Each of our 24 blocks of fruit has its own zone so that we can individually tailor water delivery depending on the differing requirements of the soil and vines. The ability of the water to penetrate the soil is also a focus as improper water techniques can create a hard layer under the surface which results in run off which is damaging for the soil and for the waterways the soil travels to.

At XL Vineyard, one of our core values lies in our commitment to the sustainability of the land and the bounty that comes from it. Using nature to combat nature, it just makes sense.



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